RAMC Association Guide to Resettlement
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    1. Resettlement is an entitlement of every Service Person leaving military service to transition into civilian life. The Armed Forces provide substantial resources, which are fully funded to support resettlement, and entitlement is not based upon rank, but time spent in Service. The policy and ongoing employment support exist to enable a Service Leaver (SL) to use their military experiences, training, transferable skills and identity to undertake meaningful activities in civilian life.
    2. Supporting members underpins RAMC Association Branch activity and the purpose of this document is to assist Branches with members who need resettlement advice, however, transition is a personal responsibility, and we should always strongly encourage individuals to use the services offered and described here to support them. The document will describe the key aspects of support for resettlement and the role of the Branch Resettlement Officer (BRO) to support members pre and post discharge from Service. It will not prescribe how resettlement activity should be undertaken but signpost BROs to ensure members understand their role and what services are available to Service Personnel (SP) to support them.
    3. Eligibility. Rules governing resettlement are covered in Joint Service Publication (JSP) 534 – The Tri-Service Resettlement and Employment Support Manual. Eligibility for service leavers is by length of service and falls into 3 categories, full details are at Annex A of JSP 534 Pt 1:
      1. Less than 4 years’ service – Early Service Leavers (ESL). Support service designed to place ESLs into Employment, Education or Training. Further details here.
      2. More than 4 but less than 6 years’ service – Employment Support Programme (ESP). Further details found here.
      3. More than 6 years’ service – Core Resettlement Programme (CRP). Full Career Transition Partnership Service including Graduated Resettlement Time (GRT) and Individual Training Cost (IRTC) of £534 to assist with training. Further details found here.

 

PRE-DISCHARGE FROM SERVICE

 

      1. Resettlement Advisory Brief (RAB). Any association member who is seeking support and is still in Service should be directed to ensure they fully engage with their current unit to access and apply for their full entitlement. It is mandatory that they attend a formal RAB. The RAB forms an important part of the individual’s transition into civilian life, and provides advice, information, contact addresses, housing information, job training and many other important areas applicable to service leavers. The RAB is carried out by the Individual Education and Resettlement Officer (IERO) usually within 3 months of entering the final 2 years of full service, or within 1 month of giving notice or on notification of discharge. Regular service personnel over the age of 50, or who have completed in excess of 30 years’ service will be allowed to commence the resettlement process early, i.e., in advance of the normal start point of 2 years prior to discharge (colloquially known as the ‘50/30 rule’).
      2. Career Transition. The key programmes to support transition are:
        1. CTP – provides the Armed Forces resettlement support on behalf of the MOD to SLs at the end of a military career. CTP provides resettlement support, career advice and training opportunities to all ranks based on entitlement. CTP support is available for all service leavers.

          The website can be accessed at https://www.ctp.org.uk/

        2. CRP – available to those who have served more than 6 years and all medical discharges regardless of time served.
          The website can be accessed at https://www.ctp.org.uk/resettlement-training
        3. ESP – available to those who have served between four and six years. The website can be accessed at https://www.ctp.org.uk/resettlement-training
        4. CTP Future Horizon – available to ESLs i.e. those who leave before the four-year point or those who lose entitlement to other programmes because of a compulsory discharge. The website can be accessed at https://www.ctp.org.uk/futurehorizons
        5. CTP Assist – is in place to help those wounded, injured and sick individuals who have the greatest need in finding a new career, that is both suited to their individual needs and fulfilling, assisting them to move on with their lives. The website can be accessed at https://ctpassist.ctp.org.uk/
        6. Specialist Support Programme (SSP) – the SSP is responsible for delivering the CTP Assist resettlement pathway to support wounded, injured and sick personnel to achieve a sustainable and fulfilling career, regardless of time served. The website can be accessed at https://ctpassist.ctp.org.uk/

 

POST-DISCHARGE FROM SERVICE

 

          1. There are 2 main areas where service leavers can be supported post-discharge from service; the official resettlement programmes and locally via branches.
          2. CRP. For those entitled to CRP the following is available post discharge:
            1. Career Advice and Guidance SP can still seek assistance and advice from their Career Consultant for up to two years after their discharge date. They can contact them by phone, email, or in person, whether it is to discuss a job application, get feedback on their CV, or simply to review their career direction. They are also able to attend CTP Employment Fairs
            2. Resettlement Training They may be able to access training courses delivered by the CTP at the Resettlement Training Centre, Aldershot and some Regional Resettlement Centres on a standby/fill up basis depending on whether they are Contract Funded or Non-Contract Funded. JSP 534 provides more details. They should contact the Course Booking and Information centre or click here for course information or contact the Course Booking & Information Centre to book a place on 02894 456 200.
            3. Job Finding Assistance For Life. Job finding assistance and access to RightJob is available through the Regular Forces Employment Association (RFEA) Employment Compass Programme (ECP), a national employment support programme designed to address the employment needs of Veteran personnel who no longer qualify for MOD Resettlement support and are returning to the employment market after 2 years post discharge from service.

              The RFEA’s aim is to assist Veterans to secure quality, sustainable employment for the rest of their working life. RFEA has an unparalleled understanding of the skills and ambitions that ex-forces/Veterans bring to the employment market. We also have a proven track record of helping all ranks, trades, backgrounds and services to find and remain in work. Indeed, in 2014 RFEA provided employment support to just over 4,000 Veterans UK wide. Click here for further information.

            4. Officers Association (OA) for Officers The OA supports you through transition to help you achieve sustainable employment in a role that feels right and takes into account your individual circumstances, aspirations and skills.

              They will partner with you to help you prepare for the challenges of civilian employment. Further details found here.

          3. ESP For those who served between 4-6 years the following is available post discharge:
            1. Career Advice and Guidance. SP can still seek assistance and advice from their Career Consultant for up to two years after their discharge date. They can contact them by phone, email, or in person, whether it is to discuss a job application, get feedback on their CV, or simply to review their career direction. They are also able to attend CTP Employment Fairs.
            2. Job Finding Assistance For Life. Job finding assistance and access to RightJob is available through the RFEA Employment Compass Programme (ECP), a national employment support programme designed to address the employment needs of Veteran personnel who no longer qualify for MOD Resettlement support and are returning to the employment market after 2 years post discharge from service.
          4. Medical Discharge. Same entitlement as CRP – see para 7.

 

BRANCH RESETTLEMENT OFFICER

 

      1. Position Branches are encouraged to identify a suitable volunteer to undertake the role of BRO. It need not be stand-alone and could be combined with another appoint – e.g. welfare.
      2. Role. The role of the BRO is to act as the single point of focus for resettlement activity and advice within the Branch.
      3. Training.No formal training currently exists for this appointment. The person nominated should be able to assist with local knowledge and contacts and be able to signpost members to key resettlement activities and assist in developing a network to secure employment.
      4. Supported activities.The BRO should hold local knowledge and information to support the following as a minimum:
        1. Local Contact Numbers Could comprise the following:
          1. Housing
          2. Medical/Dental facilities. SP will need to register with a practice.
          3. Royal British Legion - welfare and employment support.
          4. Financial advice.
          5. Schools.
          6. Employment agencies.
          7. Major Employers e.g. NHS.
        2. BROs should be the Branch POC for SL’s wishing to settle in the Branch area, support and advice could be given on the topics mentioned above. BROs should encourage SL’s when relocating into their area on discharge, to join the Branch.
        3. The BRO can assist Reserve members with advice on employment /resettlement activity and signpost when necessary.
        4. The BRO should ideally be a Committee member, their role is to be the Branch Resettlement champion and keep the committee and membership up to date with Resettlement activity and trends.
        5. BROs should have a dedicated e-mail address which can be used for BRO activity.
        6. BROs are encouraged to attend local job-fairs and other employment opportunities; this activity could be shared with the Association POC when necessary.
      5. Employment support. Helping SP access and develop a network locally to seek and gain employment may be the most important aspect of the role. The BRO ideally will be able to support members finding employment through the Branches network of local businesspeople and contacts.

        MISCELLANEOUS

      6. Learning Credits. The following are available to support service leavers:
        1. Standard Learning Credits. All soldiers and officers (Regular and Reserve) are eligible to apply for £175 every financial year. All details are contained within JSP 822 Part 1 Section 6.4.
        2. Enhanced Learning Credits. All Service personnel who serve a minimum of 6 years qualifying service (4 years prior to 01 Apr 02017) are entitled to Enhanced Learning Credits. The ELC scheme provides a single upfront payment of up to £1000 or £2000 per financial year (depending upon length of service) in each of a maximum of 3 separate financial years. It will pay up to 80% of a course with SP paying the remaining 20% from their own funds. ELC claims not used during service are available for five years post discharge.

          Full details are at https://www.enhancedlearningcredits.com/

      7. New Armed Forces Covenant Legislation:The UK government has passed new legislation, as part of the Armed Forces Bill, to help ensure armed forces personnel, veterans and their families are not disadvantaged by their service when accessing key public services. It means the Covenant is now a legally binding commitment for state/public bodies/departments such as local authorities and the NHS. It is very good news. For many public bodies it won’t mean a massive change as many Local Authorities are already doing their bit for the AF Covenant, but it should galvanise the few who are not. It is only in reference to housing, education and healthcare. It is a very positive step in the right direction, but it doesn’t include employment or employers. Here is an extract from the government news release:

        ‘The Armed Forces Bill will embed the Armed Forces Covenant into law by introducing a legal duty for relevant UK public bodies to have due regard to the principles of the Covenant, a pledge to ensure the UK Armed Forces community is treated fairly.

        Focusing on healthcare, housing and education, it will increase awareness among public bodies of the unique nature of military service, improving the level of service for members of the armed forces community, no matter where in the UK they live.’

        For more information see the following website: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-legislation-to-help-ensure-fair-treatment-for-armed-forces

The RAMC Association

William Boog LeishmanIn 1925, the RAMC Association was formed to further the camaraderie of WW1 Corps veterans with Sir William Leishman being the first President. There are now some 28 branches around UK with a predominantly veteran membership although most serving Corps members also are members centrally. The Association has traditionally been supported by Corps Funds and especially for the expenses of the branch standards and standard bearers.