RAMC Charity Chelsea Flower Show 2020
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The Royal Army Medical Corps, formed in 1898, has served the nation proudly during two World wars and through more recent conflicts where it has provided a level of care for the wounded unsurpassed in the history of medicine. We have been at the forefront of the science and art of rehabilitation for the seriously injured, who have survived because of the battlefield endeavours of our committed and selfless medics.

The garden, in many forms, has been present throughout our timeline – whether to grow vegetables in static WW1 trenches on the Somme, or through the development of modern-day pharmaceuticals, our story is entwined. More pertinently the garden can provide a safe haven for the combat stressed, a place to aid healing and adjust to life after returning from war.

With these parallels in mind, the RAMC Garden tells of our unique and compelling history; a homage to the courageous service men and women who have cared for the wounded, beyond rank or status.

Designed to be a calming space symbolising the concentration of a medic on their patient amongst the chaos of conflict, a series of impressive Carpinus ‘boxheads’ flank the perimeter of a peaceful courtyard, framing vistas into and through the garden. Effortless hardscape transitions and level changes made from Portland stone subtly guide the eye helping visitors to imagine meandering through the garden.

The gentle sound of moving water (a nod to the humanitarian efforts of the corps) adds a calming ambiance enhancing the effect of the texture-filled and elegant planting palette. Herbs and other medicinal plants feature strongly.

RAMC Charity Garden at Chelsea Flower Show Contact

For further information, comment or query please click the following link to email:

chelseaflowershow2020@
ramcassociation.org.uk
.

The RAMC Association

William Boog LeishmanIn 1925, the RAMC Association was formed to further the camaraderie of WW1 Corps veterans with Sir William Leishman being the first President. There are now some 28 branches around UK with a predominantly veteran membership although most serving Corps members also are members centrally. The Association has traditionally been supported by Corps Funds and especially for the expenses of the branch standards and standard bearers.