The Association Chairman's Page
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Brig MacMillan

It is now 6 months since I became Chairman and quite a lot has been happening since then. We have had a successful Corps Sunday with three Standards dedicated at the Service including one for our new Branch at Chorley. We had a magnificent Battlefield Tour to WW1 sites, conducted by Pete Starling, in September and my wish is that we will repeat such an exercise annually hereafter; there is another planned for May 2020 at Arnhem, the details of which are elsewhere on the website. At the Field of Remembrance one of our members, Michael Cane from Maidstone, scored quite a hit with the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, so much so that this featured on ITV news that evening. Forty Association Members marched past the Cenotaph on Remembrance Sunday.

Organisational changes are afoot. Our longstanding Secretary, Chris Richards, is standing down at the end of the year and Mike Ryan, recently retired from Regular service, is taking over. I shall pay a tribute to Chris later on at the end of his actual tour of duty. Our Social Media voice, Diane Donnelly, has stepped down from her duties and I have already paid tribute, appropriately on her beloved Facebook, to her work for the Association. Diane will continue to do other work for the Association. Kim Bourne has taken over this role and we look forward to seeing what Social Media innovations she will give us. In the round, we have made new arrangements for this website by employing a professional website operator.

I am exploring how we can improve the linkage between our Branches and the Field Army, Regular and Reserve, in order to promote both understanding and mutual support. From next month there will be a Regular feature about the Association in the Medic Magazine. Further inroads into the blockages in informing and involving currently serving personnel with the Association are ongoing.

The Central Executive of the Association is here not only to direct policy but to help and assist Branches. To that end, Maidstone Branch is to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the death of LCpl Eric Harden VC in January 2020. The Branch’s arrangements are being augmented by the Association at large and I would wish to see such support to other projects, elsewhere in the country, in due course. I am also exploring a model of recruiting mentors and enablers to assist Branches to modernise and recruit. I am starting out in Scotland with a group of recently retired senior officers from both the Regular and Reserve RAMC to see if we might swell membership as well as lower the average age profile. The Association is for both Officers and Soldiers so we need to be attractive to both constituencies through our Events.

That is enough for now. I am ending this short brief with my personal congratulations to three of our Members who have recently received Commendation Certificates from me for their long service and great work on behalf of the Association: Diane Donnelly, Michael Cane and Colin Miles; you may or may not know much of the two latter names but they have been stalwarts of Maidstone Branch for many years. So Branches, if you have a worthy and long standing Member within your firmament who has given service over and above the call of normal duty, please let me know the details so that the Association can bring wider recognition and acknowledgement of this out into the open.

Alistair Macmillan
Nov 2019

Brig MacMillan

It is a great privilege to have been appointed as Chairman of the RAMC Association for the next 5 years and I look forward very much to rising to the challenge of leading the Association effectively during my tenure. It is a mighty organization first setup by the then DGAMS, Sir William Leishman, in 1925 and still encompasses some 28 Branches including one in Cyprus.

I fully realize that the Association is essentially an ageing one and that younger soldiers today find other ways and means to communicate and socialize with each other. Even though all serving members of the Corps are Association members, we have seen fewer of them joining us on their retirement. Many don’t know what the Association does and how it can help them after their service. So my initial main effort will be to explore better mechanisms of communication with the serving Regular and Territorial personnel. We need to make those isolated instances of interaction between units and Association Branches the norm across our network. I also believe we need to get together better with other organisations that serve the ex-RAMC community like RAMC Re-United and explore how we can cooperate better to mutual advantage.

Now the life-blood of the Association is its Branches. The Branches are where our membership resides and functions. So I am also looking at how the Association’s Executive Committee can assist Branches more, physically and financially, to aid the lot of the membership.

I look forward to getting around the Branches during my stint and to meeting as many members as possible. I hope many of you can continue to support such gatherings as Corps Sunday, the Annual Service and AGM at the National Arboretum and Remembrance Sunday. We had 16 Standard Bearers on parade at the Arboretum recently so let’s aim at increasing this for the remaining central functions this year.

In Arduis Fidelis,
Alistair Macmillan
May 2019

Dear All,

I am writing to let you all know that, for personal reasons, I am resigning as Chairman of the Association, with effect from the end of this month. I am very conscious that this will cause difficulties as, according to the rules, a new chairman will probably not be able to be voted in before the next AGM. Our President, Mark Pemberton, is looking at the way in which/if an inter regnum arrangement can be put in place until that time, but as this is a unprecedented situation it is not easy. I particularly regret that this will, amongst other things, leave the Association without a representative on the Trust Board, although Mark is also chairman of that body and may be able to speak on our behalf.

Brigadier Macmillan was born in Glasgow in 1948 and after school in England studied medicine at Glasgow University, graduating in 1974. After house appointments in Glasgow he mustered for duty as a medical officer in the RAMC in 1975 having been a medical cadet. He retired in 2004 having been a Consultant in Public Health and having undertaken a variety of both command and staff functions in the Defence and Army Medical Services. His service included studying at the Army Staff College and latterly being a Queen’s Honorary Physician. He was an airborne soldier in both the Regular and Territorial Army. He is possibly best known as the architect of NATO’s first Multi-national Integrated Medical Unit and as the deviser of the Medical Regiment.

In his retirement he has been heavily involved in veterans’ mental health charities and served as a Colonel Commandant RAMC as well as being Honorary Colonel to 144 Parachute Medical Squadron and 225 (Scottish) Medical Regiment. During his time as a Colonel Commandant he was President of the RAMC Association and Chairman of the RAMC Charity finishing as Chairman of the RAMC Benevolence Committee.

He lives in the West of Scotland with his wife, Lesley, of 43 years. Lesley until recently ran her own business and also showed and bred Labrador Retrievers. They have a daughter who works in Conservation. In his spare time he is involved in researching and writing on Military Medical History and is an avid supporter of Scottish and Glasgow Rugby

In his retirement he has been heavily involved in veterans’ mental health charities  well as being Honorary Colonel to 144 Parachute Medical Squadron and 225 (Scottish) Medical Regiment. During his time as a Colonel Commandant he was President of the RAMC Association and Chairman of the RAMC Charity finishing as Chairman of the RAMC Benevolence Committee.

He lives in the West of Scotland with his wife, Lesley, of 43 years. Lesley until recently ran her own business and also showed and bred Labrador Retrievers. They have a daughter who works in Conservation. In his spare time he is involved in researching and writing on Military Medical History and is an avid supporter of Scottish and Glasgow Rugby

If this is your first visit to our Association web-site, I hope that you have found it informative and useful. For those who have been here before, you will have noticed (I hope) that we have made some changes to it. These have been mostly in in response to the request we made for comments about it during last year. This includes the facility now to join the Association on-line. A lot of thought has gone into this and the system seems to be working well.

I addition, you will find that we now have a link to the “Blue Book” events and bookings can be made through this. Details are given for each event and I hope that you put them into your diaries and Branches will include them into your local programmes. Although in the Branches you all have your local ideas and functions, the national events are key times when we have the opportunity to come together as the Association and celebrate the pride that we have in our Corps.

2 May – The AGM of the RAMC Charity. The Association is a sub-committee of the Charity, which is a Company Limited by Guarantee and holds an AGM at the RHQ in Camberley at 1400hrs. This meeting is open to all serving, retired and reserve members of the RAMC and RAMC Association. It gives us the opportunity to hear what about the various groups in the Charity and understand how the Association fits into its overall work. Having Association members there emphasises our part in the scheme of things.

9 May – The Annual Corps Service held at the National Arboretum at Alrewas, followed by the Association AGM and buffet lunch. The cost if the lunch is very reasonable, for what is on offer, but you can attend the service and AGM without having to have it.

17 June – Corps Day. Another time to celebrate our Corps, not only with an inspiring act of worship but also the march past. This is followed by a very good lunch that is paid for by central funds, during which the Corps band plays and they are always worth hearing. Our participation in the march past is specially geared to cater for those of us who can’t step out as well or as far as we used to be able.

It is very important that we have as good an attendance as possible at these events and Branches may think about organising car sharing or even a mini bus. The Board of Trustees of the RAMC Charity authorises the subsidy of costs from the use of some of the funds they allocate to the Association. Bids for this must be made through the Association Secretary and to make sure we can deal with them, please get them in as soon as possible.

I wish you all a very enjoyable time with the Association during 2018. I look forward to seeing you at the national events.

The RAMC Association

William Boog LeishmanIn 1925, the RAMC Association was formed to further the camaraderie of WW1 Corps veterans with Sir William Leishman being the first President. There are now some 28 branches around UK with a predominantly veteran membership although most serving Corps members also are members centrally. The Association has traditionally been supported by Corps Funds and especially for the expenses of the branch standards and standard bearers.